Elder Abuse

Estate of Esther P. v. Doe Hospital and Roe Nursing Center: San Bernardino, California.

$2 million settlement for death of elderly female as a result of chronic abuse and neglect that led to development of malnutrition, dehydration, infections, an above the knee amputation and death.

 

Estate of Bertha K. v. Doe Convalescent: Long Beach, California.

$2 million settlement for death of elderly female as a result of chronic abuse and neglect that led to development of malnutrition, dehydration, pressure sores and death.

 

Andy v. Roe Healthcare: Phoenix, Arizona.

$875,000 wrongful death of a twenty (20) year old dependent adult that was the victim of abuse and neglect that led to pressure sores, septicemia and death.

 

Estate of Herman J. v. Doe Board and Care: Anchorage, Alaska.

$700,000 settlement for death of married father of two (2) as a result of being fed the wrong diet which led to a diabetic coma and death.

 

Estate of Jean C. v. Doe Hospital: Los Angeles, California.

$750,000 settlement for death of elderly female as a result of chronic abuse and neglect that led to development of dehydration, renal failure, pressure sores and death.

 

In Re Mauricio V. v. Doe Board and Care: Oxnard, California.

$475,000 settlement for disabled dependent adult who was the victim of sexual abuse by another disabled dependent adult that was left unsupervised despite repeated warning signs that placed owners on notice.

 

Helen C. v. Doe Convalescent Hospital: Los Angeles, CA

$995,000 settlement for death of 87-year old female as a result of abuse and neglect that led to Stage IV bedsores, infections and death. Facility claimed it was not responsible and elder’s co-morbidities were the primary cause of all complained-of injuries

 

Jeanette G. v. Doe Residential Care Facility for the Elderly: Los Angeles, CA

$970,000 settlement for death of demented 86-year old female that was left unsupervised and suffered a catastrophic fall from her wheelchair. Facility claimed it did nothing wrong and was prevented by law from “restraining” the patient in her chair.